Thursday, December 03, 2015

Snowflake Bentley would love these flakes!


15 comments:

  1. Here in Deanlandia we are expecting 1-3" of snow today! YEAH!!

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    1. We got a few loose flakes but nothing to speak of. :-(

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  2. Replies
    1. Bernie could truly change this country. He is radically consistent. has sticktoitiveness, and at heart really doesn't care what Republicans or Democrats in Congress think of him. He is for the people and his ego isn't a problem. We need Bernie!

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    2. Yes, very good!

      --Alan

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  3. Them's some beautimous flakes, listener. Haven't seen the like since I was little. . . .

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    1. It's the sort we get most often. Here and northern Japan. Lucky am I!

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  4. Firearms idea from Missouri--restrict like abortions. [Click] And after purchase, require liability insurance comparable to that for automobiles, sez I.

    --Alan

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  5. While idling at the airport in San Diego I found some more information about Parker 51 pens on a collector's website that enabled me to date my father's to 1949.

    I seem to have been able to recondition the pen easily. It had been put away with ink in it, which had long since (maybe sixty years ago) dried out. I soaked the business end of the pen in several changes of cold water overnight, then flushed out the ink sac with the built-in filler mechanism until no more ink came out, and left it to drain into a tissue. Inspection with a magnifying glass reveals no damage to the nib; the whole pen seems to be just fine. The Parker 51 was designed to work with probably the most chemically ferocious (but fastest drying) fountain pen inks ever made, so it's tough. Since my father last filled it with blue ink, I will do the same. I decided on standard Pilot blue fountain pen ink--good dark color, safe for all pens, reasonably priced, and very water-resistant. (Water resistance is evidently very rare in blue inks.) The Parker 51 is a bit on the small side, but still looks very modern; It has been recognized as one of the best industrial designs of all time. My heart is going to be in my throat when I fill and test it.

    --Alan

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    1. Ooooooo, let us know how it is for you when you finally do it.

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  6. Long day in San Diego yesterday, but another satisfied customer. It really is a shame that there are no forensic toxicologists in the area to work for the defense bar, but that is not uncommon. It has been an unpopular field for a long time, and the old folks are retiring or otherwise becoming unavailable. San Diego is not unusual that way. It will give me something to do after I "retire."

    --Alan

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  7. Thanks, Alan, for keeping the blog rolling, even when I slipped up.

    It sure does sound like you'll be all set in retirement.

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    1. I think I will be OK in retirement. I suppose it is normal to be a little apprehensive about it, and not having a role model may put me at a somewhat greater disadvantage. I will be the first man in my family to stop working before becoming physically incapable of working, at least during my lifetime. Fingers crossed that things keep on rockin' along as they are for a bit longer.

      --Alan

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    2. I'm kinda thinking you're gonna do well. Enjoy!

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    3. I probably will. Just realized I misspoke, though. I had one uncle who retired when he was still able-bodied, but he was no role model. He was well off thanks to a good defined benefit retirement plan and his inheritance, but every bit of it slipped through his fingers and he died destitute. To put the best face on it, he was generous to his church far beyond his means; if he had merely tithed, he would have been fine.

      --Alan

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