Wednesday, March 02, 2016

It's time for Flowers...


23 comments:

  1. Bernie is First in Vermont, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Colorado...

    Yes We Can.

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  2. It is indeed time for flowers.

    After Lorna Doone I zoomed through a delightful children's book called Land of the Pharaohs. The first couple chapters recounted the discovery of King Tut's tomb and the remainder was a reconstruction of life in the boy king's day and age. Though I then started A Time Traveler's Guide to the Fourteenth Century, I put it aside in favor of Tarzan the Terrible. The Medieval History book is fascinating, but I needed something a bit less intense, or at least less intellectually challenging. Haven't been feeling too well the past few days, and Tarzan is more my mental speed at the moment.

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  3. On the last thread Cat asked about delegate counts. Counting only pledged delegates -- the ones who really matter -- Hilary has 486, Bernie has321, and 71 are uncommitted or to be decided. But it's important to remember that Hilary's biggest strength has been in the South and only three Southern states -- North Carolina, Florida, and Louisiana -- haven't voted yet. Alan is right: It looks like a long, hard slog to the convention.

    Which makes me sad that I have decided not to attend the Bernie "organizing rally" in Chicago tonight. But that would represent a commitment to put in a lot of time over the next two weeks, and I haven't yet caught up from the mid-February deadlines in my paying work. Wouldn't it be nice if we didn't have to sleep? (Well, maybe not, considering the science fiction novella I am currently reading.)

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    1. I forgot Mississippi. So seven of 11 Southern states have voted. Outside the South, Hilary has won three states and American Samoa for a net gain of ten delegates. Outside of New Hampshire and Vermont, Bernie has won three states for a net gain of 31 delegates.

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    2. Good analysis, Bill; certainly better than the MSM.

      Alan

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    3. Update: There are now just 14 delegate races that have not been decided. Hilary leads 603 to 404.

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  4. I see in the cold light of dawn that HRC won Massachusetts by a whole one per cent. That's not much of a win for someone who was going to stroll to an overwhelming victory against trivial opposition. Here are a couple of items:

    Jill Stein on Bernie’s campaign [Click]

    Jesse Ventura on Bernie’s campaign [Click]

    --Alan

    P.S.: Does anyone know how Democratic party delegates are allocated to the various states? By population? By party registration? By votes in the previous presidential election? Or ?????

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  5. answering my own question...

    -Alan

    There are two basic types of Democratic convention delegates: pledged and unpledged. A candidate is eligible to win a share of the pledged delegates at stake in a state if he or she receives at least 15 percent of votes cast in a primary or the preferences expressed in a caucus, either in a congressional district or statewide. Individuals who are pledged delegates are "pledged" to support the candidate to whom they are allocated. There are expected to be approximately 4,051 pledged delegates at the 2016 convention. There are three categories of pledged delegates: congressional district delegates, at-large delegates and pledged party leader and elected officials (PLEO delegates).[11]
    Congressional district delegates are allocated proportionally based on the results of the primary or caucus in a congressional district. The number of district delegates who are apportioned to each congressional district is determined by the Democratic vote in each district in recent elections. At-large delegates are allocated proportionally based on the statewide results in the primary or caucus. Pledged party leaders and elected officials (PLEO delegates) are delegates by virtue of their office; PLEO delegates can include statewide elected officials, state legislators, local elected officials or party leaders. PLEO delegates are allocated proportionally based on the statewide results of the primary or caucus.[12]

    BallotPedia [Click]

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  6. An email from Ben Carson announced that he will not be attending tomorrow night's GOP presidential debate. He says further: "I do not see a political path forward in light of last evening’s Super Tuesday primary results. However, this grassroots movement on behalf of “We the People” will continue."

    Not saying in so many words that he is suspending his campaign, but that's what it amounts to. It's been pretty clear for a while he wasn't going to make it, but unlike some money-driven candidates he stuck it out until things were beyond doubt.

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    1. He's going to make an announcement on Friday.

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  7. I can't properly express how happy it makes me that Hillary won no delegates at all in Vermont!!!

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    1. That says a lot about the popularity of Senator Sanders with his constituents. Maybe it's about time for Vermont's establishment Dems to get on the wagon or get out of the way, eh?

      --Alan

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  8. The Day the Republican Party Ruptured [Click] They’re gonna need one BIG hernia belt…

    There’s Still Time for a Primary Bombshell [Click] Howard figures the direction of the race will probably be settled March 15th. I think he’s probably right. Also about Bernie going all the way to the convention.

    And after the conventions there is still plenty of time for bombshells. Remember Thomas Eagleton? And no one of note has yet been found in bed with a dead girl, live boy or vice versa.

    --Alan

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  9. This bothers me greatly:


    Winner
    H. Clinton 50.1% 603,784 63
    B. Sanders 48.7% 586,716 46

    Read more: http://www.politico.com/2016-election/results/map/president#ixzz41nheM1OI

    Why so many more delegates for so few votes?

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    1. I think politico.com lumps together the superdelegates (i.e. elected officials and party pooh-bahs, who can change their votes at will) with the pledged delegates. I hear that Bernie wants to get rid of the superdelegates. Their purpose is to limit the likelihood of an unelectable nominee, but there are arguments on both sides of that issue.

      --Alan

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    2. She gained only a 2 pledged delegate edge from her Massachusetts victory.

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    3. Thanks, Bill. That's good to know, though the result is gonna rankle for a while. I'd hoped New England would present a united front. Purely symbolic of course, but it would have been a nice bloc on the map.

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    4. As memory serves me, when listening to the audio biography of Calvin Coolidge they described how the western and eastern parts of the state were significantly different in a number of ways, which meant their politics were different. I suppose the distinction still endures. Same here--the metropolitan coastal areas of California are economically, culturally, and politically distinct from the inland areas. To some extent that is perpetuated by prejudicial disregard (or worse) by the politicians from populous coastal areas. Which naturally results in acting-out by some of the folks so disregarded.

      --Alan

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  10. I do not believe I have ever before had more than one bumper sticker on my car, but this year is shaping up to be different. I now have a plan.

    Currently I have my "Bernie 2016" bumper sticker on the left (natch!) of the rear bumper.

    This weekend my "Where is the New Deal When We Need it?" bumper sticker goes in the middle.

    Also this weekend my square National Recovery Administration blue eagle sticker with the slogan "An idea whose time has come--AGAIN" goes on the lower left of the rear window.

    If Bernie wins the Democratic nomination, his bumper sticker stays where it is. (Maybe it would be replaced with one naming his running mate as well.)

    If Bernie should not become the Democratic nominee, his bumper sticker also stays where it is. But it will be partially overlaid (so the original can easily be identified) with (probably) one for the Green Party nominees.

    That's a lot of signage, but it floats my boat.

    --Alan

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    1. Sounds like a great plan, Alan.

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    2. Thanks. And bumper stickers (particularly unusual ones) make it easier to identify the car (a bog-standard, medium-sized gray sedan) in a parking lot.

      Alan

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  11. If you stick your sticker to vent closing magnetic sheets, it's easy to remove if needed/wanted. Also does stay on the bumper very well.

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