Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Shakespeare in the Park

M u c h . A d o . A b o u t .  N o t h i n g


18 comments:

  1. Here's for much ado about Howard!

    listener--happy computering to you! If it comes to that, I think the new MacBook Airs with Haswell CPU's and consequently about double battery life are now available. And congrats on the decimal point! It must be a tremendous relief given your family history.

    Re photos--still looking for one of Cat's elevator--or a link to an advertising page.

    Failure to get enough votes for a guilty verdict in a court martial results in a verdict of "not guilty."


    Wikipedia article on hung juries:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hung_jury [Click]


    Extract:

    "In United States military justice, the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. Chapter 47) Article 52 specifies the minimum number of court martial panel members required to return a verdict of guilty. In cases that involve a mandatory death sentence, a unanimous vote of all panel members is required. In cases that involve mandatory life sentences or sentences of confinement over ten years, a three-fourths vote is required. In all other cases, only a two-thirds vote is required to convict. Additionally, the Manual for Courts-Martial requires only a judge and at least five panel members in all non-capital cases. In capital cases, a panel of 12 members is required."

    http://usmilitary.about.com/od/justicelawlegislation/l/aacmartial2.htm [Click]


    Extract:
    "Deliberations and Voting. One departure from civilian cases arises in the way the court-martial members vote. Most civilian court systems require the jurors to vote unanimously to convict. Because of the need for expeditious resolution of cases, Congress directed that a vote of "two-thirds" of the court-martial members is needed before the accused may be found guilty of any offense charged. If the vote is less than a two-thirds to convict, a verdict of "not guilty" is required. As such, the military does not experience "hung juries," as do civilian jurisdictions. However, death penalty cases require a unanimous verdict. Voting is done by secret, written ballot. Although court-martial members are usually of different ranks, they are not permitted to use superiority of rank to influence or pressure another member."

    --Alan

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  2. As my memory serves me, the composition of the panel in the court martial I attended last week was:

    Six members; three officers (two lieutenants and a lieutenant commander); three enlisted members (two warrant officers and a chief petty officer); three men and three women; and four racial/ethnic groups. It's hard to imagine any better balance than that, and it is not atypical in my experience.

    I must admit to my own prejudices in the case, although I will not state them publicly. I am very curious about the outcome; I expect to hear along about Wednesday or Thursday.

    --Alan

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    Replies
    1. When I was in the service I always thought of warrant officers as a third group: neither enlisted nor commissioned officers, but in between.

      What the Navy calls petty officers are, of course, enlisted. The equivalent of sargents in the Army.

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  3. Amber was moved down a step in ICU this morning. Good sign things are improving.

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  4. Okay, listener, we've got drafts scheduled through the end of the month. Facebook wouldn't display any of your pics for me, so I used mine.

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    Replies
    1. ♥ Thank-you!!!! ♥

      'Though what's up with mean ol' Facebook?!

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    2. facebook has been extremely screwed up for me for better than a week. I'm only seeing about half or less of my newsfeed, it won't erase notifications at the top when I look at them, if I like something, it pops me to the top of the page, and it's particularly being stingy about letting me see pictures, my own or others.

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  5. Re parade expenses: I heard from Hank. As I had come to suspect, he was giving me the total of all the bills he was responsible -- not just the ones still outstanding. Money to cover the bill is in hand, although with not much left going forward.

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  6. It's been a while, but I've got a couple new posts here.

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  7. Facebook has shut down on me. I can't like or comment or see others' comments. I'll be back when facebook lets me.

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    Replies
    1. What?!! Absurd!!!

      Can you get a note through to their tech help?

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  8. Amber update: Out of ICU and in Rehab at the hospital.

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    Replies
    1. Oh, what truly wonderful news!! Hallelujah!!

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    2. Great stuff!!

      --Alan

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  9. They're afraid of us… [Click]

    If the Government has to get warrants for domestic spying, what next? The right of habeus corpus, maybe? Prohibition of extrajudicial executions? The mind boggles…


    --Alan

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